Frannie Says: Don’t leave your dog in the car during winter.

Frannie

After a year of being mostly at home with their people, we know some dogs dislike being separated from them, even for a little while. It’s hard to resist taking them along wherever you go! However fun and harmless it may seem, with Twin Cities temperatures set to remain subzero over the next few weeks, please remember it is unsafe to leave your dog alone in a car for any amount of time.

What is common knowledge during the hot summer also applies to the cold winter; if it is unsafe for a human, it is unsafe for a dog. Cars get cold extremely fast. Although your dog’s coat helps regulate their temperature, it won’t keep them warm enough in a freezing car.

While some breeds, like Huskies, naturally handle cold weather better than others, multiple factors such as age and underlying health conditions determine how the cold will affect your dog. For example, cold can trigger flare-ups in conditions like arthritis which tend to affect joints and extremities that get colder faster. Dogs with short coats or shorter legs may have an increased risk of developing hypothermia.

While your dog may love the cold and snow on walks, movement increases and regulates body temperature. Dogs in a car can’t stay as warm as when they exercise, so their body temperature will drop faster.

If your dog doesn’t love staying at home alone or would benefit from a break in routine, Downtown Dogs has you covered. At just $5 an hour, doggy daycare isn’t only for long days in the office (even if that’s the kitchen table right now) or special occasions. Dropping off your pup for an hour or two is a great way to get them some exercise and socialization, safe from cold temperatures, while you run some errands or check off things off of your to-do list.

At Downtown Dogs we separate dogs by play style rather than size or breed, assuring your pup is matched with the best play mates for their unique personality. As dog lovers ourselves, we understand your care and concern for your dog’s mental and physical health, especially during these difficult and chilly times. As experienced professionals, we partner with you to keep your dog safe and engaged. Visit our website or call us at (612)374-3647 to schedule your dog’s initial evaluation. No reservation is needed for daycare once we evaluate their play style. Come and play whenever!

When not sharing advice, our dog bloggers — Frannie, Lyle, and Helen — share a space with their people, Ralph and Abbe Bernstein.”